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20131103
20131103
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
national security agency contractor, edward snowden, one former aide to the chancellor said that snowden has done the western world a great service and it's up to us to help him. today on "face the nation," rejecting the idea that snowden be granted any clemency. >> can he had an opportunity if what he was was a whistle blower to pick up the phone and call the house intelligence committee, the senate intelligence committee. that didn't happen. and now he's done this enormous disservice to our country and i think the answer is no clemency. >> a republican counterpart in the house also dismissed the idea. >> no, i don't see any reason. you know, we -- i wouldn't do that. >> the suspect in friday's fatal shooting of a tchl sa altsa age has been charged with murder. paul ciancia wrote a note indicating that he intended to die during the attack. he survived after being wounded by the police. >>> four prominent scientists, including james hansen, distributed a joint letter citing the need for nuclear power plants. they wrote renewables like wind and solar and biomass cannot scale up fast enoug
contractor, edward snowden. >> the national security agency took the unusual step thursday of denying a report that'ves drop on the vatican phone calls and may have tapped in on pope francis before he was elected. what are you making up? is this a church, state issue? >> you got in on the consistent, the ones that depict the new pope, john? >> who knows. saved a lot of money. those guys have not done anything that was not known to the national security council and the white house and the idea of blaming these guys who are doing the job they were signed to do and oh my goodness, for miss feinstein, that there's a touch of hypocrisy here. >> there's a lot of outrage. i'm with clapper on this issue as well. i mean, i think because of the technological advances and the fact that we can now, you know, look in on people's cell phones, that you know, there has to be some more guidelines brought into this thing. but overall, friends spy on friends, it's not going to stop. >> what do you think of that? >> i think, well, i'm not enough people, clearly. there's no doubt that this has been g
the spying of the national security agency was. berlin officials also want snowden to show them the original documents the former nsa analysts has leaked. records show the u.s. has spied on leaders of 35 countries, including german's chancellor, angela merkel. >> one of the original mercury 7 astronauts has been laid to rest. scott carpenter, seen here on the far left, died from complications of a stroke. he was 88. john glenn, another mercury astronaut, was among the mourners yesterday. he was the second american to orbit the earth, and later had a successful career as an aquanaut. >>> much has been written about the new subsidized insurance rates under obamacare. but equally important is the free care that's now available to many more people under med e cal, the state's version of medicaid. michael finney tells us what it takes to qualify. >> nora is get hearing blood sugar level checked. this preventative care is something she might not have done in the past. >> i couldn't afford it. this is really, you know, caused a lot of problems in the family because it's not only me, it's my family,
to help investigate the national security agency. >> well, the only investigation here is to what extent he knew about the material that he stole and who else he worked with. certainly the russians are not allowing him to stay in the country of russia because they think he's just a nice guy there. is clearly more to this story. i think that is a -- if he wants to come back and open up to the responsibility of the fact that he took and stole information, he violated his oath, he disclosed classified information, that by the way has allowed three different terrorist organization, affiliates of al qaeda to change the way they communicate, i'd be happy to have that discussion with him. but he does need to own up with what he's done. if he wants to talk through why he did it those things that would be the appropriate time and the appropriate way to do it. >> schieffer: you would not be willing to give him any kind of clemency, i take it? >> no. i don't see any reason. i wouldn't do that. he needs to come back and own up, we can have those conversations if he believes there's vulnerabilities
and question edward snowden. germany wants to know how extensive the spying of the national security agency was. and berlin officials want snowden to show him the original documents that he has leaked. >>> in his weekly address, president obama talked about the need to pass a budget that includes spending on education and research. he said a budget shouldn't be cut just for the sake of cutting. >> remember our deficits are getting smaller, not bigger. on my watch they are falling at the fastest pace in 60 years. that gives us room to fix our long term debt problems without sticking it to young people or undermining our bedrock retirement and health security programs. >> house and senate budget negotiators want to divert a new round of cuts. >>> if you want to go online to check on the affordable health care plans tonight you're out of luck. the health insurance website is off line until tomorrow morning. a technology team will be working on >>> there is no reason for wine lovers to panic. there were 300 million cases last year. down 5% from the year before. it's the lowest level since the 1960s
the national security agency has done what many people thought could not be done. the nsa has cracked the powerful encryption which protects bank transfers and medical records and trade secrets as they travel through cyberspace. "the new york times" says the nsa treats its recent successes in deciphering protected information as among its most closely guarded secrets which is why then nsa won't talk to us about kriping to ra if i but martin has been arguing with and working with the nsa since 1975. thank you for being with us this morning. let me ask, and i understand you have no special way of peeking inside the nsa. these encryption standards, i always heard it would take 100 computers 100 years to break the sort of encryption standards we use today. am i wrong? >> it's complicated. the basic standard known as the advanced encryption standard, it would take millions of computers millions of years to break, but it's how you implement it. it's like if you have a resettable combination lock with let's say four digits and you set it to one, two, three, four, that will be real easy to s
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)

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